ABOUT THE FAIR

Ocean Drive and 12th Street, Miami Beach, Florida, USA

04.12.2019 – 08.12.2019

During UNTITLED, ART MIAMI BEACH 2019, Galerie Ron Mandos proudly presents a group presentation with work by Hans Op de Beeck (BE, 1969), Ryan McGinness (USA, 1972), Isaac Julien (UK 1960), Lieven Hendriks (NL, 1970), and Pavel Grosu (MD, 1991). These artists share a common interest in a fundamental research into the possibilities of their artistic medium. By investigating the essence of painting, sculpture and photography, these artists put the power of imagination to the test, thereby challenging the observation of the viewer. Their craftmanship invites the viewer to take a step closer and experience the richness of form and color through a multitude of layers. By observing these artworks from different perspectives, they turn out to express a surprising disruptiveness, asking urgent questions about society and artistic traditions. Through the ever-fluctuating shapes and colors of their work, these artists continue to disrupt our perception of surface and space. What you see is not always what you get.

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Hans Op de Beeck (BE, 1969) produces large installations, sculptures, films, drawings, paintings, photographs and texts. His work is a reaction to our complex society and the universal questions of meaning and mortality that resonate within it. He regards man as a being who stages the world around him in a tragi-comic way. Above all, Op de Beeck is keen to stimulate the viewers’ senses and invite them to really experience the image. He seeks to create a form of visual action that delivers a moment of wonder, silence and introspection.

Previously, Op de Beeck’s work has been shown at The Smithsonian’s Hirshhorn Museum and Sculpture Garden, Washington D.C.; Kunstmuseum Wolfsburg, Wolfsburg; GEM, The Hague; MUHKA Museum of Contemporary Art, Antwerp; Centre Pompidou, Paris; Tampa Museum of Art, Tampa; and P.S.1-MoMA, New York.

Ryan McGinness (USA, 1972) is credited with elevating the status of the icon to fine art. By fragmenting, altering and layering images of logos and symbols, human organs and plant life, fairy tails and everyday scenes, McGinness builds up his dense networks of brightly colored fantastical imagery. Swathed in ornate, curvaceous lines, McGinness’s compositions are a postmodern twist on the eighteenth-century Rococo style, characterized by playful opulence and intricate, coiling forms. His extensive vocabulary of original graphic drawings that use the visual language of public signage, corporate logos, and contemporary symbology finds expression in his paintings, sculptures, installations, and books. McGinness’s work can be found in such art institutions as MoMA, New York; The Metropolitan Museum of Art, New York; The Museum of Contemporary Art, San Diego and many private and corporate collections including the Neuberger Berman Collection, the Schwab Family Collection, and the Charles Saatchi Collection.

Isaac Julien (UK, 1960) is as acclaimed for his fluent, arresting films as his vibrant and inventive museum installations. One of the objectives of his work is to break down the barriers that exist between different artistic disciplines, drawing from and commenting on film, dance, photography, music, theatre, painting and sculpture, and uniting them to construct a powerfully visual narrative. In Julien’s most recent series of work, A Marvellous Entanglement, the artist reflects on the modernist architecture of Lina Bo Bardi and her approach to Brazilian culture.

Recent solo exhibitions include Zeitz MOCAA, Cape Town; Fondation Louis Vuitton, Paris; MoMA, New York and Art Institute of Chicago. Julien’s work is held in collections that include Tate, London; MoMA New York; Centre Pompidou, Paris and the Solomon R. Guggenheim Museum. He was awarded the title Commander of the Most Excellent Order of the British Empire (CBE) in the Queen’s birthday honours, 2017 and made a Royal Academician in 2018.

Lieven Hendriks (NL, 1970) takes everyday subjects in which the human touch is visible as a starting point for his work. For example, he paints nails in walls, stars and vases cut out of paper, and finger drawings on foggy windows. By using trompe l’oeil effects, his flat canvases appear as loosely stretched linens, deceiving the eyes of the viewer. In his work, Lieven Hendriks, plays a game with the nature of observation. His paintings anticipate how we look at art, how we focus our attention, and how this process is affected by surrounding circumstances. In this way, his work touches directly on the essence of painting and the value attached to it.

Lieven Hendriks (1970) studied at the HKU in Utrecht and was a resident at De Ateliers in Amsterdam. His work is part of many renowned international collections, including Museum Voorlinden, Wassenaar; ESMoA Los Angeles; and the Centraal Museum, Utrecht.

Pavel Grosu’s (MD, 1991) approach to painting is characterized by the prominence of the figurative, the preference for vague historical or social references, and the emphasis on the technical quality of the works, seen first and foremost as aesthetic objects.In his newest series ‘Fragmented Dreams’,Grosu is challenging the many facets of representation through his often surrealist combination of elements. The fusion of contemporary human figures and ancient statues create an ongoing process of symbolism and signification, leaving the viewer in a state of wonder.

Pavel Grosu was born in 1991 in the Republic of Moldova. He currently lives and works in the Romanian city of Cluj-Napoca, where he is doing a doctorate at the University of Art and Design. He recently has shown works at the Five Plus Art Gallery, Vienna, Austria (2016); Doris Ghetta Gallery, Milan, Italy (2017); Boccanera Gallery, Trento, Italy (2017); and Sector1 Gallery, Bucharest (2017).

FAIR ARTWORKS

ABOUT Lieven Hendriks

Lieven Hendriks takes everyday subjects in which the human touch is visible as a starting point for his work. For example, he paints nails in walls, stars and vases cut out of paper, and finger drawings on foggy windows. By using trompe l’oeil effects, his flat canvases appear as loosely stretched linens, deceiving the eyes of the viewer. In his work, Lieven Hendriks, plays a game with the nature of observation. His paintings anticipate how we look at art, how we focus our attention, and how this process is affected by surrounding circumstances. In this way, his work touches directly on the essence of painting and the value attached to it.

Creating hyperreal illusions requires mastery of one’s technique. When seeking to deceive his audience, Hendriks pulls out all the stops to make his work absolutely lifelike. Nothing is allowed to interfere with the illusion. For the artist, painting amounts first and foremost to a conscious demonstration of the highest professional skill. He uses his technical virtuosity to make the viewer think about the way we are used to look at paintings. Although his images seem to be crystal clear at first, they actually make us doubt through their ambiguity.

Lieven Hendriks (1970) studied at the HKU in Utrecht and was a resident at De Ateliers in Amsterdam. His work is part of many renowned international collections, including Museum Voorlinden, ESMoA Los Angeles, and the Centraal Museum in Utrecht.

www.lievenhendriks.com

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ABOUT Pavel Grosu

Born in 1991 in Singerei, The Republic of Moldova.

Lives and works in Cluj-Napoca, Romania.

Pavel Grosu’s approach to painting is characterized by the prominence of the figurative, the preference for vague historical or social references, and the emphasis on the technical quality of the works, seen first and foremost as aesthetic objects. The artist deploys digital collage as a tool for building complex, carefully thought out compositional structures, later translated into paintings. In his newest series ‘Fragmented Dreams’, Grosu is challenging the many facets of representation through his often surrealist combination of elements. The fusion of contemporary human figures and ancient statues create an ongoing process of symbolism and signification, leaving the viewer in a state of wonder.

Pavel Grosu’s work engages with the topic of the fragmented or split reality in which we live. His paintings take as a starting point images from the media, being brought together as in a collage. He manipulates these media images in various ways to produce initial forms of digital collage: they are cut, juxtaposed, reshaped, blurred or inverted. By contorting them in some way, they confront the viewer with a rather confusing blend of visual stimuli – a disconcerting and disquieting mosaic.

Pavel Grosu was born in 1991 in the Republic of Moldova. He currently lives and works in the Romanian city of Cluj-Napoca, where he is doing a doctorate at the University of Art and Design. He recently had a solo exhibition at Sector 1 Gallery Bucharest and has shown works at the Five Plus Art Gallery, Vienna, Austria; Doris Ghetta Gallery, Milan, Italy; Boccanera Gallery, Trento, Italy, and Untitled, Miami Beach, USA.

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ABOUT Isaac Julien

Filmmaker and installation artist, Isaac Julien CBE RA, was born in 1960 in London, where he currently lives and works. His multi-screen film installations and photographs incorporate different artistic disciplines to create a poetic and unique visual language. His 1989 documentary-drama exploring author Langston Hughes and the Harlem Renaissance titled Looking for Langston garnered Julien a cult following while his 1991 debut feature Young Soul Rebels won the Semaine de la Critique prize at the Cannes Film Festival.

Having recently worked on conserving and restoring Looking for Langston images from his extensive archive, he exhibited of photographic works at Victoria Miro Gallery, London (2017), Jessica Silverman Gallery, San Francisco (2016) and Ron Mandos Gallery, Amsterdam (2016) with a screening of the film in its original 16mm print at Tate Britain.

Julien’s solo exhibitions and presentations include Zeitz Museum of Contemporary Art Africa (Zeitz MOCAA), Cape Town (2017); Platform-L Contemporary Art Centre, Seoul (2017); The Royal Ontario Museum, Toronto (2017); Fondation Louis Vuitton, Paris (2016); MAC Niterói, Rio de Janeiro (2016); Museo Universitario Arte Contemporáneo (MUAC), Mexico City (2016); De Pont Museum, Netherlands (2015); Museum of Modern Art, New York (2013); Art Institute of Chicago, Chicago (2013); The Bass Museum, Miami (2010); Museum Brandhorst, Munich (2009); Museum of Modern Art, Dublin (2005); Centre Pompidou, Paris (2005) and Moderna Museet, Stockholm (2005). His latest work, Stones Against Diamonds, was shown in 2015 as part of the Rolls-Royce Art Programme at the Venice Biennale, at Art Basel and Art Basel Miami Beach.

Julien participated in the Venice Biennale at the inaugural Diaspora Pavilion at the 57th edition in 2017 with Western Union: Small Boats. Previously, he presented Kapital and directed Das Kapital Oratorio in the 56th edition of the Venice Biennale, curated by Okwui Enwezor, in 2015. His work has also been exhibited in the 7th Gwangju Biennial, South Korea (2008); Prospect 1, New Orleans (2008); Performa 07, New York (2007) and in documenta 11, Kassel (2002).

Julien’s work is held in collections that include: Tate, London; the Museum of Modern Art, New York; Centre Pompidou, Paris; the Solomon R. Guggenheim Museum, New York; the Hirshhorn Museum and Sculpture Garden, Washington DC; the Albright-Knox Art Gallery, Buffalo, New York; Fondation Louis Vuitton, Paris; the LUMA Foundation, Arles; the Kramlich Collection; the Zeitz Museum of Contemporary Art (Zeitz MOCAA), Cape Town. In 2016 the Towner Art Gallery Collection (Eastbourne, UK) acquired Ten Thousand Waves (2010) as part of a Moving Image Fund program. Ten Thousand Waves, a globally acclaimed multiple screen installation work, premiered at the 2010 Sydney Biennale and has gone on to be exhibited extensively – recently at Platform-L in Seoul (2017) and Fondation Louis Vuitton in Paris (2016) as well as the Museum of Modern Art, New York in 2013, with whom he also published a comprehensive monographic survey of his life and work, titled ‘Riot’.

Julien has taught extensively, holding posts such as Chair of Global Art at University of Arts London (2014-2016) and Professor of Media Art at Staatliche Hoscschule fur Gestaltung, Karlsruhe, Germany (2008 – 2016). He is the recipient of the James Robert Brudner ‘83 Memorial Prize and Lectures at Yale University (2016). Most recently he received the Charles Wollaston Award (2017), for most distinguished work at the Royal Academy Summer Exhibition and in 2018, he was made a Royal Academician. Julien was awarded the title Commander of the Most Excellent Order of the British Empire (CBE) in the Queen’s birthday honours, 2017.

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ABOUT Hans Op de Beeck

Hans Op de Beeck (Be) produces large installations, sculptures, films, drawings, paintings, photographs and texts. His work is a reflection on our complex society and the universal questions of meaning and mortality that resonate within it.

He regards man as a being who stages the world around him in a tragi-comic way. Above all, Op de Beeck is keen to stimulate the viewers’ senses, and invite them to really experience the image. He seeks to create a form of visual fiction that delivers a moment of wonder, silence and introspection.

Hans Op de Beeck was born in Turnhout in 1969. He lives and works in Brussels and Gooik, Belgium. Op de Beeck has shown his work extensively in solo and group exhibitions around the world.

He has had substantial institutional solo shows at the GEM Museum of Contemporary Art of The Hague, The Hague, NL (2004); MUHKA Museum of Contemporary Art, Antwerp, B (2006); Centraal Museum, Utrecht, NL (2007); the Smithsonian’s Hirshhorn Museum and Sculpture Garden, Washington DC, US (2010); Kunstmuseum Thun, CH (2010); Centro de Arte Caja de Burgos, Burgos, ES (2010); Butler Gallery, Kilkenny, IRL (2012); Kunstverein Hannover, D (2012); Tampa Museum of Art, Tampa, USA (2013); the Harn Museum of Art, Gainesville, FL, USA (2013); FRAC Paca, Marseille, F (2013); MIT List Visual Arts Center, Cambridge, Boston MA, US (2014); MOCA Cleveland, OH, US (2014); Sammlung Goetz, Munich, D (2014); Screen Space, Melbourne, AU (2015); Espace 104, Paris, FR (2016); Art Unlimited, Basel, CH (2016); Kunstraum Dornbirn, Dornbirn, AU (2017); Museum Morsbroich, Leverkusen, DE (2017); Kunstmuseum Wolfsburg, Wolfsburg, DE (2017); Fondazione Museo Pino Pascali, Polignano a Mare, IT (2017); …

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ABOUT Ryan McGinness

“I’m trying to communicate complex and poetic concepts with a cold, graphic, and authoritative visual vocabulary. I concentrate on shape, line, color, and composition to communicate within simplified picture planes. As such, the work resides somewhere between abstraction and representation.

At the essence of our being is the need to know and the need to understand. I am interested in our need to read into and interpret—to make sense of chaos and give meaning to seemingly abstract forms. This interpretation involves an egocentric faith in the fact that there must be a meaning for us to understand. We surrender our logic to the belief that answers do indeed exist, and so, by default, we invent them. With my work, interpretations are not absolute, but guided, to allow for multiple reads. This allows the viewer to bring to the work his own history, memories, and knowledge to find a personalized meaning.”
— Ryan McGinness, 2005

Ryan McGinness’s work consists of an amalgam of icons and symbols. Drawing from his background in the design industry, Ryan McGinness’s work resolves the clinical graphic aesthetics of media as vast, contemplative fields of intimate meditation. It incorporates strong social commentary on iconography, language, and historical and contemporary symbolism. His graphic drawings and personal iconography are replicated, recontextualized, and materialized infinitely throughout his densely layered paintings.

Born and raised in the surf and skate culture of Virginia Beach, Virginia, McGinness moved on to study at Carnegie Mellon University in Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania as an Andrew Carnegie Scholar. During college, he worked at the Andy Warhol Museum as a curatorial assistant, which inevitably influenced his proclivity toward pop and graphic aestheticism. Known for his original extensive vocabulary of graphic drawings that use the visual language of public signage, corporate logos, and contemporary iconography, McGinness creates paintings, sculptures, and environments and fabricate the iconography of contemporary experience as spiritual and timeless.

McGinness’s work can be found in such art institutions as The Museum of Modern Art in New York, The Museum of Contemporary Art San Diego and the Cincinnati Art Museum, and private and corporation collections including the Neuberger Berman Collection, the Schwab Family Collection, and the Charles Saatchi Collection.

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