ABOUT THE FAIR

Galerie Ron Mandos is excited to participate in the 2022 edition of Art Rotterdam. The artists featured in our booth are Atelier van Lieshout, Sebastiaan Bremer, Robert Devriendt, Kendell Geers, Katinka Lampe, Muntean/Rosenblum, Erwin Olaf, Hans Op de Beeck and Gilleam Trapenberg.

Find us at Booth 35 at Art Rotterdam 2022. For more practical information, click here.

READ MORE

Atelier van Lieshout
Atelier Van Lieshout is the studio practice of Rotterdam-based artist Joep van Lieshout  (NL, 1963). Since its founding in 1995 Van Lieshout has been working solely under the studio’s name as a methodology towards undermining the myth of the artistic genius. Over the past three decades AVL produced a multitude of works on the border of art, design, and architecture. These works share a number of recurring themes and obsessions, such as systems, power, autarky, sex and life and death. AVL is internationally renowned for sculptural installations which harbor a controversial, sinister and playful tone.

Sebastiaan Bremer
Sebastiaan Bremer’s (NL, 1970) artistic career spans across disciplines and media, but he has become particularly renowned for his ability to transform pre-existing images into ornate, dreamlike tableaux. The works at Art Rotterdam 2022 look like out of focus landscapes, which provide a horizon for us at this strange time. Bremer’s project can be seen as a renewed attempt to create a future, a horizon, overseen by these living forms with long lifespans, the trees that surround and oversee us.

Robert Devriendt
Robert Devriendt’s (BE, 1955) oeuvre mostly exists of small paintings. In these works, painted fragments are brought together in sequences. They generate an intimate story for the viewer and convey a feeling like stills of a film. The themes and the combinations of paintings are not chosen at random; they demonstrate Devriendt’s affinity with painting, cinematography, and the image.

Kendell Geers
A European by descent, an African by birth, the works of Kendell Geers (ZA, 1968) embody the contradictions of his identity. In his recent work, the artist embraces the still life tradition because he sees a direct link with his Dutch ancestors and history of Afrikaners in South Africa. He has returned to the still life tradition because it links the past and the future. The flowers are beautiful and their colors invite attention, the poetic expression of peace, love and joy. At the same time, the images dying flowers and the image of Matisse’s cut out of Icarus warn us against our vanity or hubris in relation to nature.

Katinka Lampe
Katinka Lampe (NL, 1963) traverses the realms of figurative, expressionist, and abstract painting in her soft, yet uncanny, portraits. Her works, though imbued with a sense of realism, are not meant to represent those that they depict. Through the obvious use of light and shadow, perspective or crop, Lampe tries to bring alienation but above all space into the work. For her, craftsmanship, aesthetics, ornament and control are the tools to create a new image that contributes to a certain reset. Resetting our judgment of others, resetting our social relationships.

Muntean/Rosenblum
Muntean/Rosenblum’s (AT, 1962 / IL, 1962) works are painted in a unique technique that they developed over the last few years. It is a combination of oil and pastel chalks which allows them to create a maximum of luminosity. Like all their paintings it is based on appropriated material from the almost unlimited images provided by mass and social medias. On the other hand, they are inspired by the singular power of figurative painting. They make depictions of the sensual world and highly abstract symphonies of colors and brushstrokes at the same time.

Erwin Olaf
Erwin Olaf (NL, 1959) explores our human condition through meticulously staged scenes. His distinctive aesthetic is highly stylized and perfectly polished, yet his work penetrates deep beneath a pretty facade. Olaf’s series Fall originated in his interest in portraits that are out-of-sync. For him, it became a new type of sexy to photograph a beautiful model blinking at the wrong moment, and using a camera angle that is slightly wrong. It is both disturbing and revealing to see this moment frozen in a photograph.

Hans Op de Beeck
Hans Op de Beeck (BE, 1969) produces large installations, sculptures, films, drawings, paintings, photographs, and texts. His work is a reflection on our complex society and the universal questions of meaning and mortality that resonate within it. The sculpture Dancer (2019) is based on Op de Beeck’s movie Sea of Tranquillity (2010), in which a most colorfully dressed Brazilian dancer is sitting on a chair, exhausted, as if sitting in a silent void. She is detached from the circus of spotlights and glamour, almost clumsily lost in a moment of reflection or doubt, in-between performances.

Gilleam Trapenberg
Gilleam Trapenberg’s (CW, 1991) creates portraits of acquaintances and friends, images of landscapes and residential areas in the Netherlands Antilles, and panoramas as found in travel brochures. Trapenberg raises a number of issues surrounding the representation of the Caribbean. In his photographs, warm memories of his youth on the island of Curaçao are alternated with traces of the colonial past and subtle undertones of political misrule, but also individual pride and expressions of identity.

Art fair images

FAIR ARTWORKS

ABOUT Robert Devriendt

Born in 1955 in Burges, Belgium
Lives and works in Bruges and Zwevezele, Belgium

The works of Robert Devriendt are assembled in such a way as to create cinematic montages. The themes and the way the paintings are combined demonstrate their relationship with the art of painting, film and the image in general. Dark personages and surprising props are depicted in changing scenes in which some drama seems to be taking place. He investigates the way in which images work and are interpreted, in which misunderstanding plays a key role. In doing so, he adopts a clear standpoint within visual culture and the vision of reality. The observer, seen by Devriendt as a voyeur, is invited to interpret the ‘interrupted story’ like a detective. His imagination is stimulated by the spaces between the paintings. Devriendt’s illusionist painting technique, reminiscent of the Flemish Primitives, also casts a spell on the observer.

He presented solo exhibitions at BOZAR, Palais des Beaux Arts, Brussels (2017); MOCAK, Krakow (PO) (2016); Groeningemuseum, Bruges (2015); Museum Dhondt-Dhaenens, Deurle (BE) (2009); Musée des Beaux Arts, Tourcoing (2009) or SMAK, Stedelijk Museum voor Aktuele Kunst, Ghent (2001). Group exhibitions include M HKA, Museum van Hedendaagse Kunst, Antwerp (2017); Royal Museums of Fine Arts, Brussels (2013); National Art Museum of China, Beijing (CN) (2010); Wiels, Brussels (2010); TENT, Rotterdam (2003) or The Reykjavik Art Museum (IS) (2001).

GO TO THE ARTIST PAGE

ABOUT Erwin Olaf

Erwin Olaf was born in 1959 in Hilversum, The Netherlands
He lives and works in Amsterdam, The Netherlands

Erwin Olaf is an internationally exhibiting artist whose diverse practice centers around society’s marginalized individuals, including people of color, and the LGBTQ+ community. In 2019 Olaf became a Knight of the Order of the Lion of the Netherlands after 500 works from his oeuvre were added to the collection of the Rijksmuseum. Taco Dibbits, Rijksmuseum director, called Olaf “one of the most important photographers of the final quarter of the 20th century”.

In 2018, Olaf completed a triptych of monumental photographic and filmic tableaux portraying periods of seismic change in major world cities, and the citizens embraced and othered by their urban progress. Like much of his work, it is contextualized by complex race relations, the devastation of economic divisions, and the complications of sexuality. Olaf has maintained an activistic approach to equality throughout his 40-year career after starting out documenting pre-AIDS gay liberation in Amsterdam’s nightlife in the 1980s.

A bold and sometimes controversial approach has earned the artist a number of prestigious collaborations, from Vogue and Louis Vuitton, to the Stedelijk Museum Amsterdam. He served as the official portrait artist for the Dutch royal family in 2017, and designed the national side of the euro coins for King Willem-Alexander in 2013. He has been awarded the Netherlands’ prestigious Johannes Vermeer Award, as well as Photographer of the Year at the International Color Awards, and Kunstbeeld magazine’s Dutch Artist of the Year.

Erwin Olaf has exhibited worldwide, including Centro de Arte Contemporáneo de Málaga, Málaga, Spain; Museu da Imagem e do Som, São Paulo, Brazil; Martin-Gropius-Bau, Berlin, Germany; Southeastern Center for Contemporary Art, Winston-Salem, North Carolina, USA; and Museo de Arte Contemporáneo, Santiago, Chile. In the spring of 2019, Olaf’s work was the subject of a double exhibition at Kunstmuseum The Hague and The Hague Museum of Photography, as well as a solo exhibition at the Shanghai Center of Photography. In 2021, Erwin Olaf had his first solo exhibition Im Wald at Galerie Ron Mandos and mounted a large survey exhibition at Kunsthalle München, Germany.

Olaf’s work is included in numerous private and public collections, such as the Rijksmuseum and Stedelijk Museum, both in Amsterdam, The Netherlands; Fonds National d’Art Contemporain, Paris, France; Museum Ludwig, Cologne, Germany; Museum Voorlinden, Wassenaar, The Netherlands, North Carolina Museum of Art, Raleigh, United States; Art Progressive Collection, United States, and the Pushkin Museum, Moscow, Russia.

Visit the artist’s website here.

GO TO THE ARTIST PAGE

ABOUT Hans Op de Beeck

Hans Op de Beeck was born in 1969 in Turnhout, BE
He lives and works in Brussels, BE

Hans Op de Beeck produces large installations, sculptures, films, drawings, paintings, photographs and texts. His work is a reflection on our complex society and the universal questions of meaning and mortality that resonate within it. He regards man as a being who stages the world around him in a tragi-comic way. Above all, Op de Beeck is keen to stimulate the viewers’ senses, and invite them to really experience the image. He seeks to create a form of visual fiction that delivers a moment of wonder and silence.

Over the past twenty years Op de Beeck realised numerous monumental ‘sensorial’ installations, in which he evoked what he describes as ‘visual fictions’: tactile deserted spaces as an empty set for the viewer to walk through or sit down in, sculpted havens for introspection. In many of his films though, in contrast with those depopulated spaces, he prominently depicts anonymous characters.

Hans Op de Beeck was born in Turnhout in 1969. He lives and works in Brussels, Belgium. Op de Beeck has shown his work extensively in solo and group exhibitions around the world.

GO TO THE ARTIST PAGE

ABOUT Kendell Geers

Born in May 1968, Johannesburg, South Africa
Lives and works in Brussels, Belgium

Born into a working class Afrikaans family during the height of Apartheid, Kendell Geers quickly found himself fighting a Crime Against Humanity on the front lines of activism and protest. Running away from the military regime and a six year prison sentence, he escaped to London in 1988 as a political refugee. In 1989 he moved on to New York where he found employ as Richard Prince’s full time assistant. Following the release of Nelson Mandela, Geers returned to South Africa in 1990 to help build the new democracy.

From his strong experiences as a revolutionary, he developed a psycho-social-political practice that held ethics and aesthetics to be opposite sides of the very same coin, spinning upon the tables of history. In his hands, the discourse of art history is interrogated, languages of power and ideological codes subverted, expectations smashed and belief systems transformed into aesthetic codes. The raw energy of a Punk attitude is blended with the visceral visionary philosophy of poets like Rimbaud, Blake and Burroughs in an uncanny cocktail of unexpected contrasts.

A European by descent, an African by birth, Kendell Geers work embodies the contradictions of his identity, being both Animist and Mystic, Shaman and Alchemist, Punk and Poet. The warp of popular culture is woven into the weft of poetry, painting, literature and ritual. He uses experience to colour perception, spiritualising matter and materialising spirit, mocking tradition like an iconoclast whilst celebrating history like a Medieval Monk.

Believing that art is as political as it is spiritual, Kendell Geers’ varied practice cannot be simplified, cannot be reduced to cliché or fashion. Working as an artist, musician, designer and writer, his strategies are without compromise because he believes that “Art changes the world – one perception at a time.”

GO TO THE ARTIST PAGE

ABOUT Atelier Van Lieshout

Atelier Van Lieshout is the studio founded by sculptor, painter and visionary Joep van Lieshout. After graduating at the Rotterdam Art Academy Van Lieshout quickly rose to fame with projects that travelled between the world of easy-clean design and the non-functional area of art: sculpture and installations, buildings and furniture, utopias and dystopias.

In 1995, Van Lieshout founded his studio and has been working solely under the studio’s name ever since. The studio moniker exists in Van Lieshout’s practice as a methodology toward undermining the myth of the artistic genius. Over the past three decades, Van Lieshout has established a multidisciplinary practice that produces works on the borders between art, design, and architecture. By investigating the thin line between manufacturing art and mass-producing functional objects, he seeks to find the boundaries between fantasy and function, between fertility and destruction. Van Lieshout dissects systems, be it society as a whole or the human body; he experiments, looks for alternatives, takes exhibitions as experiments for recycling, and has even declared an independent state in the port of Rotterdam AVL-Ville (2001)—a free state in the Rotterdam harbour, with a minimum of rules, a maximum of liberties, and the highest degree of autarky. All of these activities are conducted within Van Lieshout’s signature style of provocation—be it political or material.

Van Lieshout combines an imaginative aesthetic and ethic with a spirit of entrepreneurship; his work has motivated movements in the fields of architecture and ecology, and has been internationally celebrated, exhibited, and published. His works share a number of recurring themes, motives, and obsessions: systems, power, autarky, life, sex, and death—each of these trace the human individual in the face of a greater whole such as his well-known work the Domestikator (2015). This sculpture caused controversy before even being placed at the Louvre in Jardin de Tuilleries, but was adopted by Centre Pompidou where it was shown during FiAC (2017).

Van Lieshout’s works have been included in the Gwangju, Venice, Yokohama, Christchurch, Shanghai and São Paulo biennials. AVL is in part of the permanent collections of public and private institutions such as: Museum Boijmans Van Beuningen, Rotterdam; Stedelijk Museum, Amsterdam; Centraal Museum, Utrecht; Van Abbemuseum, Eindhoven; Bonnefantenmuseum, Maastricht; Museum Kröller-Müller, Otterlo; Museum Voorlinden, Wassenaar; Centre Pompidou, Parijs; Collectie Marta Herford, Herford; Stichting Prada, Milaan; FNAC, Parijs; Ludwig Forum, Aken; Folkwang-museum, Essen; Migros Museum für Gegenwartskunst, Zürich; MoMA, New York, en het Walker Art Center, Minneapolis.

GO TO THE ARTIST PAGE

ABOUT Katinka Lampe

Born in 1963 in Tilburg, NL
Lives and works in Rotterdam, NL

Katinka Lampe traverses the realms of figurative, expressionist, and abstract painting in her soft, yet uncanny, portraits. Her works, though imbued with a sense of realism, are not meant to represent those that they depict. Resemblance is not the defining characteristic of these pieces. Instead, the artist sees the figures as visual impressions that, once transformed by her gaze, become representative of larger themes within society, rather than the individual.

Lampe often uses accessories loaded with connotation to provoke loose characterizations of theme and mood. The imposed roles played by her models, their poses, expressions, and their way of being dressed, mostly copied from magazines, the internet or old master paintings, obscure their personality and provoke deeper and subjective meaning in the minds of the viewers. Through these juxtapositions the artist explores important societal themes relating to identity, aging, color, and the ever-growing dependence on media.

Katinka Lampe is an artist based in Rotterdam, The Netherlands. She received her degree from the Academy of Art and Design St. Joost in ‘s Hertogenbosch, The Netherlands. Her work has been widely exhibited internationally in a variety of galleries, museums, and prominent art fairs such as Museum Arnhem, Arnhem,NL: Museum Van Loon, Amsterdam, NL; Singer Museum, Laren, NL, Museum Jan Cunen, Oss, NL ; Untitled Art San Francisco, USA and Untitled, Art, Miami Beach, USA. Her work is included in the collections of 21C Museum Hotels, USA; West Sun Capital Collection, Montreal,CA: Museum Arnhem, Arnhem, NL; APMA, AmorePacific Museum of Art Seoul, KR; Museum van Loon, Amsterdam, NL; C.N.A.P Centre National des Arts Plastique, Paris, FR; Museum More, Gorssel, NL; Schunck*, Heerlen, NL; Akzo Nobel Art Foundation, Amsterdam,Nl; De Nederlandsche Bank, Amsterdam, NL; ING Collection, Amsterdam, NL; Art Curial, Paris, FR; Frisseras Museum Athens, GR, and Cobra to Contemporary/The Brown Family Collection.

GO TO THE ARTIST PAGE

ABOUT Gilleam Trapenberg

Born in 1991 in Willemstad, Curaçao
Lives and works in Amsterdam, The Netherlands

Gilleam Trapenberg (1991, Willemstad, Curaçao) moved to the Netherlands at the age of nineteen and graduated from the Royal Academy of Art in The Hague in 2017. He participated in multiple group exhibitions, such as In The Presence of Absence at the Stedelijk Museum Amsterdam (2020). In 2017 he published his first photo book Big Papi and in 2018 he was one of the nominees for the Foam Paul Huf Award. He’s the fourth recipient of the Florentine Riem Vis grant (2020). His first solo exhibition at Foam, Amsterdam opened in 2021. Gilleam Trapenberg lives and works in Amsterdam.

Through his work, Trapenberg reflects on the contradictions that are part of the social landscape in Curaçao, were the idea of a utopian paradise is diametrically opposed to the realities of post-colonialism and tourism. He explores stereotypes and tropes that have manifested themselves through social culture and the Western media.

GO TO THE ARTIST PAGE

ABOUT Sebastiaan Bremer

Sebastiaan Bremer’s artistic career spans across disciplines and media, but he has become particularly renowned for his ability to transform pre-existing images into ornate, dreamlike tableaux through a careful process of enlargement and intricate hand painting that results in completely unique works.

The use of found imagery as a basis to explore ideas about time and memory has long been central to Bremer’s practice, and in the late 1990s he began experimenting with drawing directly onto the surface of photographs. Initially working with snapshots of family members or familiar places, Bremer developed his signature technique of printing the pictures in an enlarged format—well beyond conventional dimensions—and then altering and embellishing the underlying scene with delicate patterns of dots and strokes using India ink and photographic dye, or applying splashes of paint.

Over the past decades, Bremer has used this approach to create a progression of distinct bodies of work, expanding the scope of his source materials from purely personal moments to an array of images that have captured his imagination or held significance in his life. These range from adaptations of Rembrandt etchings to Brassaï’s photographs of Picasso’s studio and Bill Brandt’s series of close-up images of his famous subjects’ eyes, as well as the vintage lithographic flower prints used in Bremer’s Bloemen series.

Whether starting from the work of an iconic artist or revisiting his own family albums, as in his series Veronica, 2018, silver gelatin prints he produced from long forgotten negatives of candid shots his father took of his mother in her mid thirties, Bremer’s choice of visual documents is rooted in his biography. Hints of his native Holland permeate his work, from his appreciation of the way light falls across a room reminiscent of a Vermeer interior to the exquisitely painted addition of a pointillist feather or flowers to a contemporary photograph that transports the viewer to the world of Dutch Old Master paintings. In engaging with images of others, he is constantly investigating his own memories and thoughts, weaving a dialogue between the underlying photograph and the marks he uses to transform but never completely obscure it, thus creating a physical representation of the confluence of our inner and outer lives.

Sebastiaan Bremer studied at the Vrije Academie, The Hague and Skowhegan School of Art and Sculpture, Maine. The artist currently lives and works in Brooklyn, New York. His work has been the subject of three major catalogs: Monkey Brain (2003), Avila (2006), and To Joy (2015), and has been exhibited in such venues as the Tate Gallery, London; the Brooklyn Museum of Art, New York; The Gemeentemuseum, The Hague; and the Aldrich Museum, Connecticut. Bremer’s work is in the permanent collections of institutions including the Museum of Modern Art, New York, the Los Angeles County Museum of Art, Los Angeles, the Albright Knox Art Gallery in Buffalo, and the Victoria and Albert Museum, London.

GO TO THE ARTIST PAGE

ABOUT Muntean / Rosenblum

Markus Muntean was born in 1962 in Graz, Austria. Adi Rosenblum was born in 1962 in Haifa, Israel.
Muntean/Rosenblum live and work in Vienna, the city where they met while studying at the end of the 1980s. The artists have collaborated since 1992.

Large-scale painting is one of the core aspects of their practice. However, they often expand their work by creating large installations with sculptural elements where performances are staged or films screened. In addition, they make drawings as well as collages with texts and photographs.

In their work, Muntean/Rosenblum mix references to art history and present-day popular culture. They mostly depict groups of apparently lethargic or melancholic young people in idle situations, which are either ordinary and everyday or mysterious and ambiguous. The often-dreamy scenes take place in rooms, public spaces or landscapes as if part of a film, presenting unresolved situations in the making. The characters seem to adopt postures copied from fashion magazines, or from paintings originating from the renaissance to the nineteenth century. Their work is frequently accompanied by captions or texts not-directly relating to the depicted scene, adding another layer of complexity. The artists themselves described their work as ‘precise ambiguity’. By playing with visual codes from the past and the present, Muntean/Rosenblum scrutinise the power of images and how these constitute an overwhelming collective memory.

Work by Muntean/Rosenblum has been exhibited widely in international museums, institutions and galleries. Recent solo exhibitions were at Espacio Marte, Mexico City (2020); MAC, Coruña (2018); MOCAK, Krakow (2018); Group exhibitions they recently participated in were, among others, at Tel Aviv Museum of Art (2019); Kunsthaus Graz (2018); Nam June Paik Art Centre, Gyeonggi-do (2018); The Parkview Museum, Singapore (2017); and Oude Kerk, Amsterdam (2016). Their work is included in both private and public collections, such as the MoMA, New York NY; the Albertina, Vienna; 21c Museum, Louisville, KY; the KRC Collection, Voorschoten; The Rubell Family Collection, Miami, FL, and Cobra to Contemporary/The Brown Family Collection. In 2022 the artist duo will mount an exhibition at the Albertina Museum, in Vienna, Austria.

GO TO THE ARTIST PAGE