Volta Basel

BOOTH: A3
Basel
10.06.2013 - 15.06.2013

Galerie Ron Mandos proudly presents a new series of work from Dutch artist Rik Smits (1982). Smits graduated from the Royal Academy of Art, The Hague in 2010. His works were part of the Best of Graduates Show 2010 at Galerie Ron Mandos in Amsterdam. Since then his highly detailed drawings have succeeded to build a notable following of his work. Premiering at the Volta Show will be his first 3D-work entitled Capital One. This large format scale model is of a utopian city. Like his drawings, this work combines different scales of buildings and is inspired by various architectural styles, most notably art deco. Also to be exhibited will be the new large format drawing Cathedral, a work that demonstrates the full range of skill Smits possesses to imaginatively represent a fictitious location. The fictional architecture and urban scenes of Rik Smits are imbued with the artist’s own sense of an idealised yet (paradoxically) flawed future. Smits’ imagined metropolis clearly testifies to mankind’s drive to material improvement. Inspired by Modernist architecture, his city is littered with skyscrapers and architectural icons designed to impose and impress. They illustrate a level of prosperity reached and also testify to man’s desire for power, wealth and status. Mankind’s material needs in this way become the foundation for his city. Rik Smits on his work: “The most prominent facet of this city is perhaps its appearance, from which one can easily read that the main ideology of its inhabitants is Capitalism. But this ideology manifests itself in a dogmatic manner. It is a mode de vie that is seen as offering spiritual redemption for its followers. The city exhibits the self-confidence of a utopia but also the emptiness of a deserted ruin. The towering Art Deco skyscrapers stand proud like medieval cathedrals. They cast their shadow over desolate and damaged monuments, which represent the lost moral standards and values of humanity. Forgotten values that have been exchanged for the never-ending drive towards material fulfillment”.

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